Where Did Tornadoes Hit In Alabama Yesterday?

Where Did Tornadoes Hit In Alabama Yesterday
Does Alabama have a high incidence of tornadoes? The National Weather Service noted that the average number of tornadoes that Alabama experiences in a single year during the past 30 years is 47. In Alabama, how many tornadoes are there on average every year? There are 1,200 tornadoes per year, but only around 20 of those are considered to be “killer” storms, resulting in an annual death toll of approximately 60 people.

  • The state of Alabama had the highest number of tornadoes ever recorded for the month of March this year.
  • Even while tornadoes are not uncommon in Alabama, the state has had a very active start to 2019, with more tornadoes already having occurred than is typical for the state in a whole year.
  • How many tornadoes made landfall in the state of Alabama? As of the 25th of March, the National Weather Service (NWS) in Birmingham, Alabama, told Newsweek that the state has already recorded at least 26 tornadoes.

As a point of contrast, the state documented 73 tornadoes over the entirety of the year 2020.

Where did the tornado touch down in Alabama last night?

BALDWIN COUNTY, Ala. (WKRG) – Late on Tuesday night, a WKRG News 5 viewer was able to capture on camera a tornado that had just touched down in Baldwin County. This video and images was provided to us by Blake Salter from somewhere in the region between Foley and Summerdale. Debbie Williams, a reporter for WKRG News 5, was there in the region after the storm had passed through.

Where in Alabama were tornados?

Where Did Tornadoes Hit In Alabama Yesterday On Tuesday morning, severe thunderstorms rolled over Central Alabama, triggering a number of tornado warnings, bringing down trees and power lines, as well as causing intermittent power outages and deluging the area with heavy rain. There were three different waves that started about 5:30 in the morning and continued on till 1 in the afternoon over the majority of the region.

At the time, the majority of the area was under a watch for possible tornadoes. At around eleven in the morning, radar and the National Weather Service showed that there was a tornado on the ground to the south and east of Wetumpka. The storm moved in a northeasterly direction, passing across the Eclectic area.

According to Elmore County Sheriff Bill Franklin, a residence that had been abandoned and was located in the Claud – Fleahop area sustained damage. According to Keith Barnett, director of the Elmore County Emergency Management Agency, a warning for a tornado was issued for Elmore County at 10:54 a.m.

  • After that, calls of damage started flooding in almost immediately.
  • According to him, the damage produced by the suspected tornado was concentrated in two separate locations.
  • From the vicinity of Jasmine Hill Road in south Wetumpka, one track extends for a distance of four miles.
  • The alternate route starts in Claud, close to Eclectic, and travels for seven kilometers via the village of Kent.

According to Barnett, as of about three in the afternoon on Tuesday, there were reports of up to 15 residences that had sustained some form of damage, the most of which was caused by fallen trees. According to him, it’s possible that some of those were just duplicate reports for the same address.

The Emergency Management Agency is going to perform damage assessments. The mayor of Wetumpka, Jerry Willis, stated that many roads in the Wetumpka region were closed due to felled trees on Tuesday afternoon. One of those roads included the entrance route to the Smoke Rise subdivision. According to what he indicated at the time, it was anticipated that the roads leading to that neighborhood would be shut for many hours owing to felled trees and powerlines.

Katie Johnson, who lives on Firetower Road and is very close to Highway 14, stated, “I heard it as it came over.” “It happened in such a hurry. While I was watching WSFA, they reported that there had been a verified tornado in Elmore County close to Wetumpka.

After using the restroom, it seemed like just a minute or two had passed when I heard a rumbling coming from all throughout the house. I had a lot of anxiety.” Her house was unharmed throughout the incident. According to accounts by the Associated Press, lightning hit a flea market in the village of Lacey’s Spring in northern Alabama, creating a fire that completely destroyed the facility.

Additionally, rising water in Mobile Bay inundated a portion of a ramp on Interstate 10. There were reports of trees falling and homes being destroyed in several of the counties that had received tornado warnings. There were no reports of any injuries.

On Tuesday, all after-school programs offered by the Montgomery Public Schools were canceled, including athletics. It was announced by MPS that pupils will be let out of school at the regular hour. At one o’clock in the afternoon, Alabama Power reported that 3,100 of its customers in central Alabama lacked access to electrical service.

This includes 560 people in Butler County, 300 people in Tallapoosa County, and 1,000 people in Elmore County. Montgomery County had 900 residents, while Elmore County had 1,000 residents. There were additional reports of power outages in the counties of Lee and Wilcox.

According to the firm, trees that had fallen caused cables to come down all around the neighborhood. They reminded us of the following safety precautions: Keep a safe distance from any downed power lines. Do not drive over lines or beneath low-hanging lines. Always operate on the assumption that electricity lines are live.

Make sure that children and animals are kept away from any downed power wires. Steer wary of any locations that include fallen trees or limbs, since these might be hiding downed power wires. Caution is required while walking near chain link fences. It is possible for dangerous lines to touch the metal.

After a storm, you should avoid walking across puddles and standing water since the water might be contacting buried or broken electrical wires and could be electrocuted. DO NOT make any effort to remove any tree limbs or other objects that are entangled in the power wires. If you notice any downed wires, please give us a call at 1-800-888-2726 or get in touch with the law enforcement department in your area.

There’s a chance of further severe weather on Wednesday. The afternoon and evening of Wednesday are expected to be marked by storms that are strong to severe, according to the forecast. This article was compiled with assistance from the Associated Press.

What cities in Alabama were hit by tornado?

Where Did Tornadoes Hit In Alabama Yesterday 03:16 – CNN is the cited source. Over 115 million are under wind alerts CNN — As a wide storm with a “plethora of weather risks” rushed over the United States on Thursday, millions of Americans were placed under winter weather alerts, wind advisories, or flood watches.

  • These watches and advisories were issued as the storm moved across the country.
  • The National Weather Service has confirmed the existence of two tornadoes that touched down around 30 miles north of Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
  • There have been reports of trees blocking roadways and structure damage of an unknown kind.

Pell City, which is located to the east of Birmingham, and Shelby County, which is located to the southeast of the city, both reported having their own tornadoes. The United States Storm Prediction Center was receiving reports of downed trees and power lines from the states of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee.

  1. According to poweroutage.us, there were around 24,000 consumers in Alabama who did not have power on Thursday night.
  2. There were 16,000 homes and businesses that were left without electricity in the state of Tennessee, while Kentucky and West Virginia each had more than 10,000 customers who were left in the dark.

Register with our meteorologists to receive a weekly email update on the weather. More than 24 million people in the north were under a winter storm warning or advisory as the storm approached. The Weather Prediction Center issued a statement earlier on Thursday morning stating that a “dynamic winter storm is building over the Southern Plains this morning and is anticipated to bring a variety of weather hazards over the central and eastern United States through early Friday.” CNN Meteorology As of late Thursday evening, a line of storms stretching from Louisiana to New England was developing.

  1. As the storm moved eastward, there were isolated pockets of possible flooding that were fueled by strong thunderstorms.
  2. These pockets were present alongside the severe weather.
  3. However, the northern edges of the warm, moist air that is colliding with the cooler air have a higher danger of flooding as a result of the collision.

Warnings of flash flooding were issued for the central region of Alabama, while flood warnings were issued for some areas of Illinois. New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia are the states in this sentence. A narrow band of snowfall, stretching from Oklahoma to Michigan, was produced by the cold side of the system.

During the passage of the storm system, Chicago was subjected to a heavy band of snowfall, which resulted in accumulations of up to 4.5 inches over the city. On February 17, Kansas City received 7 inches of snow, breaking the previous day record established in 1893 when the city received 6 inches. In certain parts of the state, the snowfall was as much as 10 inches.

However, this problem is not exclusive to the Midwest. People living as far north as Maine should be prepared for the possibility of rain turning into wintry conditions as the cold air moves across the region. According to the forecast center’s statement, winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories cover a distance of nearly 1,500 miles, ranging from western Oklahoma to northern Maine.

  • According to the tracking website FlightAware, airlines were forced to cancel more than 1,300 flights that originated or terminated in the United States.
  • According to FlightAware, a third of flights were canceled out of the Kansas City and Detroit Metro airports (together accounting for more than 140 flights).
See also:  What Is Needed To Get A Star Id In Alabama?

Cancellations affected one-fourth of the departures that were planned to take place at St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Due to the snow and ice that fell in the Chicago region, airport officials were forced to cancel hundreds of flights. According to FlightAware, cancellations included more than 260 flights at Chicago O’Hare International Airport (which accounts for 24% of the schedule) and 81 flights at Chicago Midway International Airport (which accounts for 31% of the program).

Was there a tornado in Baldwin County?

Tornado with an EF-0 rating in Baldwin and Jones County

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Damage Path – Baldwin & Jones Counties

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County Rating # of Fatalities/Injuries KML Baldwin & Jones EF-0 0 Fatalities / 0 Injuries

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Rating: EF-0 Peak Wind: 75 mph Path Length: 1.86 miles Path Width: 150 yards Fatalities: 0 Injuries: 0 Start Date: August 17, 2021 Start Time: 6:27 AM EDT Start Location: 4 ENE Greenberry Crossroads Start Lat/Lon: 32.9617 / -83.3750 End Date: August 17, 2021 End Time: 6:31 AM EDT End Location: 4 SW Coopers End Lat/Lon: 32.9429 / -83.3521

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A short tornado formed in the countryside of the southwest corner of Baldwin County, Alabama, and moved into Jones County before dissipating. Around 10:31 Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) on August 17, 2021, the KJGX 88-D radar picked up what was known as a Tornado Debris Signature (TDS).

There have been many complaints of trees falling along Union Hill Church Road and Kitchens Road, and there have also been multiple reports of trees falling along County Line Road and Piney Woods Drive. Along the county line between Baldwin and Jones, where Union Hill Church Road and County Line Road are located, a region that is thickly forested was probably hit by the tornado.

This area is where the TDS occurred. In this region, we estimated that the greatest wind speeds reached about 75 miles per hour.

KJGX Reflectivity (6:29 AM EDT) KJGX base velocity (6:29 AM EDT)

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KJGX Correlation Coefficient (6:30 AM EDT)

How many tornadoes have hit Montgomery Alabama?

Historical Tornado Occurrences There were a total of 71 historical tornado incidents in or near Montgomery, Alabama, which had documented magnitudes of 2 or above. These events were classified as historical.

Distance (miles) Date Magnitude Start Lat/Log End Lat/Log Length Width Fatalities Injuries Property Damage Crop Damage Affected County
5.8 1956-12-23 2 32°08’N / 86°25’W 32°25’N / 86°01’W 30.50 Miles 100 Yards 1 0K Montgomery
6.5 2006-11-15 2 32°19’N / 86°14’W 32°24’N / 86°05’W 7.00 Miles 250 Yards 6 500K 0K Montgomery
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The Montgomery tornado touched down approximately 1.4 miles southwest of the Shakespeare Festival, and tracked northeastward across the Woodmere and Beauvoir Lakes Subdivisions. The tornado then crossed Interstate 85 at Bell Road and continued northeastward to the Atlanta Highway, just west of Taylor Road. Numerous trees were snapped off or downed along the path with minor roof damage to numerous homes. Near the Atlanta Highway, the tornado crossed the A.U.M. ball field complex and struck the Montgomery Postal Processing and Distribution Center and Post Office. The main doors of the post office were blown in and portions of the roof were lifted off to the north. Numerous trees were snapped off at ground level on the south and west sides of the building. A tractor trailer was completely turned around and moved 30 yards and flipped over. Other postal vehicles and cars in the parking lot were moved or received significant damage. Just to the north, the tornado produced major damage to the Fun Zone Skating Rink. This was a large metal building structure which was nearly totally destroyed. Several vehicles were tossed around and significantly damaged or crushed by debris from the building. As the tornado crossed the Atlanta Highway, several metal power poles were either significantly bent or downed. At the Saddleback Ridge Apartment Complex, at least two apartment buildings lost their roofs and portions of the second floor. The tornado continued another 2.25 miles northeastward, ending in a field just south of Wares Ferry Road. Six people suffered minor injuries. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong storm system brought severe weather and heavy rainfall to much of Central Alabama.
6.8 1979-11-25 3 32°23’N / 86°15’W 32°30’N / 86°14’W 8.30 Miles 150 Yards 20 2.5M Montgomery
7.7 1984-05-03 3 32°22’N / 86°24’W 32°26’N / 86°22’W 6.00 Miles 800 Yards 5 37 2.5M Montgomery
8.3 1975-01-10 2 32°18’N / 86°24’W 2.00 Miles 100 Yards 2.5M Montgomery
8.4 1984-05-03 3 32°26’N / 86°22’W 32°27’N / 86°21’W 1.00 Mile 800 Yards 2.5M Elmore
9.4 1996-03-06 2 32°20’N / 86°08’W 32°23’N / 86°05’W 4.00 Miles 200 Yards 2 17 1.5M Montgomery
Brief Description: The fourth in a series of four tornadoes across southern and eastern Montgomery cut a swath of destruction about 4 miles in length in an area just outside the city limits of Montgomery. The tornado began in an open field just south of a small housing development called Ranchette Estates. The tornado travelled on a path toward the northeast moving across the Country Estates Mobile Home Park where two men were killed and a number of others were injured. The tornado continued toward the northeast damaging the Georgia Washington Junior High School. It ended shortly after damaging a number of houses in the Bridlebrook Farms sub-division. About 40 homes were damaged in the Bridlebrook Farms area while nearly all of the mobile homes in Country Estates were damaged or destroyed. Total path length was about 4 miles with a path width of 200 yards. This tornado actually represents the fifth damaging event that occurred in Montgomery County between 5:12 am and about 5:30 am. M25MH, M30MH
10.1 1966-11-10 2 32°18’N / 86°30’W 32°16’N / 86°21’W 9.30 Miles 50 Yards 25K Lowndes
11.3 2008-02-17 3 32°24’N / 86°28’W 32°28’N / 86°24’W 6.00 Miles 440 Yards 50 10.0M 0K Autauga
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down near the waste water treatment facility south southwest of the city of Prattville. It then tracked northeastward and crossed US Highway 82, US Highway 31, and Cobbs Ford Road. The southern and eastern parts of Prattville sustained significant damage. The highest winds likely occurred along Cobbs Ford Road/East Main Street near McQueen Smith Road and in the Silver Hills Subdivision. An estimated 200 residential homes and 40 businesses were damaged or destroyed. Hundreds of trees were either snapped off or were uprooted along the path. In addition, 50 injuries were reported, but there were no fatalities. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A broken squall line, sparked by an advancing cold front and strong upper level storm, caused severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across Central Alabama.
11.5 1979-11-25 3 32°30’N / 86°14’W 32°31’N / 86°13’W 1.90 Miles 150 Yards 2.5M Elmore
14.4 1963-04-29 2 32°11’N / 86°31’W 32°12’N / 86°21’W 9.80 Miles 400 Yards 250K Lowndes
16.5 1957-06-28 2 32°09’N / 86°35’W 32°15’N / 86°24’W 12.80 Miles 117 Yards 25K Lowndes
18.9 1969-04-18 4 31°56’N / 86°27’W 32°13’N / 86°00’W 32.80 Miles 500 Yards 250K Crenshaw
20.0 1977-03-29 2 32°35’N / 86°31’W 32°37’N / 86°21’W 10.00 Miles 50 Yards 250K Autauga
20.5 2004-11-24 2 32°23’N / 86°40’W 32°28’N / 86°33’W 9.70 Miles 500 Yards 1 900K Autauga
Brief Description: The tornado touched down 2.5 miles to the southwest of Autaugaville. The tornado then moved northeastward across Clark’s Landing, where it destroyed several mobile homes, travel campers, and boats. After crossing Swift Creek, the tornado crumpled 2 high-voltage power line towers before moving across the Forester Community, where it partially damaged or completely destroyed several structures. Shortly after crossing CR 14, the tornado dissipated. Numerous structures and homes were destroyed along the path of the tornado. One woman sustained minor head injuries as she rode out the tornado in her car. The tornado damage path was 9.7 miles long and was 500 yards wide at its widest point. Begin: 32 23.62/86 40.37 End: 32 27.67/86 31.67
21.1 1969-04-18 4 32°13’N / 86°00’W 32°13’N / 85°53’W 6.80 Miles 500 Yards 3 250K Bullock
21.6 1977-03-29 2 32°37’N / 86°21’W 32°42’N / 86°12’W 10.50 Miles 33 Yards 2 250K Elmore
22.2 1996-03-18 2 32°09’N / 86°45’W 32°17’N / 86°29’W 16.00 Miles 100 Yards 2 100K 25K Lowndes
Brief Description: An F2 tornado began about 1.5 miles south of Gordonville in central Lowndes County at 7:12 pm and noved northeasterly taking it south and east of Moses and just north of Hayneville. The tornado crossed County Road 21 5 to 6 miles north-northeast Hayneville. The tornado crossed the Lowndes-Montgomery county line just south of U.S.80 around 7:39 pm and dissipated about three miles into Montgomery County around 7:43 pm. Two people were injured when a couple of mobile homes were destroyed on Highway 21 north of Hayneville.
22.2 1996-03-18 2 32°24’N / 86°51’W 32°18’N / 86°27’W 3.00 Miles 100 Yards Montgomery
Brief Description: An F2 tornado began about 1.5 miles south of Gordonville in central Lowndes County at 7:12 pm and noved northeasterly taking it south and east of Moses and just north of Hayneville. The tornado crossed County Road 21 5 to 6 miles north-northeast Hayneville. The tornado crossed the Lowndes-Montgomery county line just south of U.S.80 around 7:39 pm and dissipated about three miles into Montgomery County around 7:43 pm. Two people were injured when a couple of mobile homes were destroyed on Highway 21 north of Hayneville.
23.1 2007-03-01 2 32°01’N / 86°27’W 32°04’N / 86°25’W 3.00 Miles 400 Yards 4 50K 0K Lowndes
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: What would eventually become a large tornado first touched down in far southeastern Lowndes County, along US Highway 31 in the Sandy Ridge Community. The tornado tracked northeastward, roughly parallel to US 31, before moving into extreme southwestern Montgomery County. During its short path in Lowndes County, the tornado damaged several structures and downed numerous trees. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A powerful spring storm system brought an outbreak of tornadoes, damaging winds, and large hail to Central Alabama.
23.4 1956-12-23 2 32°25’N / 86°01’W 32°36’N / 85°49’W 17.30 Miles 100 Yards 0K Elmore
24.1 1976-03-12 3 32°37’N / 86°04’W 32°39’N / 86°00’W 4.90 Miles 400 Yards 15 2.5M Elmore
24.6 1979-11-25 2 31°59’N / 86°35’W 32°10’N / 86°30’W 13.50 Miles 50 Yards 12 25K Lowndes
24.9 1964-04-28 2 32°03’N / 86°29’W 31°59’N / 86°24’W 6.80 Miles 33 Yards 250K Lowndes
29.0 1963-04-29 2 32°29’N / 86°46’W 32°36’N / 86°39’W 10.60 Miles 600 Yards 250K Autauga
29.1 1976-03-12 2 32°44’N / 86°28’W 0.10 Mile 50 Yards 25K Chilton
29.5 2008-02-17 2 32°10’N / 86°49’W 32°16’N / 86°41’W 11.00 Miles 225 Yards 10 215K 0K Lowndes
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down in the Collirene Community, about 14 miles west of Hayneville. It then tracked northeastward, and ended just north of US Highway 80, several miles west of Lowndesboro. At least 11 structures, most of them mobile homes, were damaged with three of these being completely destroyed. Hundreds of trees were either snapped or were uprooted along the damage path. The most extensive damage occurred in and near the Collirene Community. Ten injuries were attributed to this tornado. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A broken squall line, sparked by an advancing cold front and strong upper level storm, caused severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across Central Alabama.
29.6 1996-03-18 3 32°39’N / 86°01’W 32°44’N / 85°55’W 10.00 Miles 440 Yards 700K 50K Elmore
Brief Description: A tornado began on the northeast side of Eclectic and extended for 10 miles in Elmore County crossing the Elmore-Tallapoosa county line just east of Highway 63. The tornado continued for another 14 miles in Tallapoosa County crossing Lake Martin and ending on the north side of Jacksons Gap not far from where a tornado had occurred earlier in the evening. This was classified as an F3 tornado with a total damage path of 24 miles with a width of a quarter of a mile at the widest. Numerous buildings of all types were damaged along the track. Some of the most intense damage occurred as the tornado emerged from crossing Lake Martin in the Peckerwood area just southwest of Jacksons Gap. Numerous permanent homes and mobile homes were seriously damaged or destroyed.
29.6 1973-03-16 2 32°42’N / 86°30’W 32°48’N / 86°23’W 9.70 Miles 77 Yards 250K Chilton
30.2 1982-01-03 2 32°41’N / 86°34’W 32°44’N / 86°33’W 8.00 Miles 80 Yards 6 250K Autauga
31.2 1982-01-03 2 32°45’N / 86°31’W 32°47’N / 86°25’W 15.00 Miles 140 Yards 250K Chilton
31.9 1982-01-03 2 32°44’N / 86°33’W 32°47’N / 86°29’W 6 250K Chilton
32.6 1982-01-03 2 32°47’N / 86°25’W 32°50’N / 86°21’W 250K Coosa
33.5 1976-03-12 3 32°35’N / 86°55’W 32°34’N / 86°38’W 16.50 Miles 100 Yards 4 2.5M Autauga
33.5 1979-11-25 2 32°43’N / 85°55’W 32°44’N / 85°54’W 1.90 Miles 60 Yards 250K Elmore
33.5 1974-12-19 3 31°56’N / 85°58’W 0.50 Mile 100 Yards 1 3K Pike
33.5 2004-11-24 2 32°39’N / 86°48’W 32°49’N / 86°26’W 22.30 Miles 1400 Yards 500K Chilton
Brief Description: National Weather Service Meteorologist made a few trips to the damage areas across Autauga, Chilton and Coosa Counties. The damage was consistent with a very large tornado with a long damage path. The tornado damage was rated an F2, but the strength of the tornado may have been stronger but the tornado affected mostly rural areas. The F2 tornado first touched down between Jones and Bethel Grove generally producing only tree damage until it reached the county line. The tornado then traveled on a northeast heading into southern Chilton County between Pletcher and Billingsley. The tornado was fairly weak at this time, blowing down and snapping off several large trees in rural areas. As the tornado approached the west side of Interstate 65, the tornado increased to F2 intensity and caused considerable damage to several structures. Continuing northeast, the tornado weakened a bit as it crossed Interstate 65 in the vicinity of mile marker 202, approximately 3 miles south of the Clanton Exit. The tornado was still strong enough at this time to down several large trees and block the northbound lanes of traffic. After crossing the interstate, the tornado regained F2 intensity moving through the Cooper Community. The tornado produced extensive structural damage in Cooper. Several homes, businesses, mobile homes and out-buildings were damaged or destroyed. Hundreds of trees were blown down or snapped off in this area. The tornado moved across eastern Chilton County and went across Lake Mitchell. At Lake Mitchell, on the Chilton/Coosa County Line, numerous homes and mobile homes were destroyed generally between Blue Creek and Cargle Creek. The tornado crossed Lake Mitchell and moved into the Coosa Wildlife Management Area along Hatchet Creek. Hundreds of trees were splintered in this area. The tornado then moved through rural Coosa County crossing US 231 just south of the Hanover Community. The tornado dissipated shortly after US 231. The tornado damage path was 49.1 miles long and an astounding 1400 yards wide at its widest point. No injuries or fatalities were reported with this strong tornado. Begin: 32 35.77/86 53.11 End: 32 59.99/86 11.45
34.3 1975-01-10 2 32°18’N / 85°41’W 1.00 Mile 100 Yards 9 250K Macon
34.4 1968-11-17 3 32°49’N / 86°27’W 32°52’N / 86°13’W 14.00 Miles 400 Yards 2.5M Coosa
35.7 1969-04-18 4 31°50’N / 86°38’W 31°56’N / 86°27’W 12.80 Miles 500 Yards 2 11 250K Butler
35.8 1979-11-25 2 31°52’N / 86°40’W 31°59’N / 86°35’W 9.40 Miles 50 Yards 25K Butler
38.5 2004-11-24 2 32°36’N / 86°54’W 32°39’N / 86°47’W 8.00 Miles 100 Yards 30K Autauga
Brief Description: National Weather Service Meteorologist made a few trips to the damage areas across Autauga, Chilton and Coosa Counties. The damage was consistent with a very large tornado with a long damage path. The tornado damage was rated an F2, but the strength of the tornado may have been stronger but the tornado affected mostly rural areas. The F2 tornado first touched down between Jones and Bethel Grove generally producing only tree damage until it reached the county line. The tornado then traveled on a northeast heading into southern Chilton County between Pletcher and Billingsley. The tornado was fairly weak at this time, blowing down and snapping off several large trees in rural areas. As the tornado approached the west side of Interstate 65, the tornado increased to F2 intensity and caused considerable damage to several structures. Continuing northeast, the tornado weakened a bit as it crossed Interstate 65 in the vicinity of mile marker 202, approximately 3 miles south of the Clanton Exit. The tornado was still strong enough at this time to down several large trees and block the northbound lanes of traffic. After crossing the interstate, the tornado regained F2 intensity moving through the Cooper Community. The tornado produced extensive structural damage in Cooper. Several homes, businesses, mobile homes and out-buildings were damaged or destroyed. Hundreds of trees were blown down or snapped off in this area. The tornado moved across eastern Chilton County and went across Lake Mitchell. At Lake Mitchell, on the Chilton/Coosa County Line, numerous homes and mobile homes were destroyed generally between Blue Creek and Cargle Creek. The tornado crossed Lake Mitchell and moved into the Coosa Wildlife Management Area along Hatchet Creek. Hundreds of trees were splintered in this area. The tornado then moved through rural Coosa County crossing US 231 just south of the Hanover Community. The tornado dissipated shortly after US 231. The tornado damage path was 49.1 miles long and an astounding 1400 yards wide at its widest point. No injuries or fatalities were reported with this strong tornado. Begin: 32 35.77/86 53.11 End: 32 59.99/86 11.45
39.9 1984-05-03 2 32°26’N / 85°37’W 32°26’N / 85°34’W 3.50 Miles 100 Yards 250K Macon
40.3 1968-11-17 3 32°54’N / 86°45’W 32°49’N / 86°27’W 18.30 Miles 400 Yards 1 24 2.5M Chilton
41.2 1972-07-03 2 31°48’N / 85°59’W 0.30 Mile 200 Yards 250K Pike
41.4 2004-11-24 2 32°53’N / 86°31’W 33°00’N / 86°11’W 18.70 Miles 1400 Yards 100K Coosa
Brief Description: National Weather Service Meteorologist made a few trips to the damage areas across Autauga, Chilton and Coosa Counties. The damage was consistent with a very large tornado with a long damage path. The tornado damage was rated an F2, but the strength of the tornado may have been stronger but the tornado affected mostly rural areas. The F2 tornado first touched down between Jones and Bethel Grove generally producing only tree damage until it reached the county line. The tornado then traveled on a northeast heading into southern Chilton County between Pletcher and Billingsley. The tornado was fairly weak at this time, blowing down and snapping off several large trees in rural areas. As the tornado approached the west side of Interstate 65, the tornado increased to F2 intensity and caused considerable damage to several structures. Continuing northeast, the tornado weakened a bit as it crossed Interstate 65 in the vicinity of mile marker 202, approximately 3 miles south of the Clanton Exit. The tornado was still strong enough at this time to down several large trees and block the northbound lanes of traffic. After crossing the interstate, the tornado regained F2 intensity moving through the Cooper Community. The tornado produced extensive structural damage in Cooper. Several homes, businesses, mobile homes and out-buildings were damaged or destroyed. Hundreds of trees were blown down or snapped off in this area. The tornado moved across eastern Chilton County and went across Lake Mitchell. At Lake Mitchell, on the Chilton/Coosa County Line, numerous homes and mobile homes were destroyed generally between Blue Creek and Cargle Creek. The tornado crossed Lake Mitchell and moved into the Coosa Wildlife Management Area along Hatchet Creek. Hundreds of trees were splintered in this area. The tornado then moved through rural Coosa County crossing US 231 just south of the Hanover Community. The tornado dissipated shortly after US 231. The tornado damage path was 49.1 miles long and an astounding 1400 yards wide at its widest point. No injuries or fatalities were reported with this strong tornado. Begin: 32 35.77/86 53.11 End: 32 59.99/86 11.45
41.5 1958-02-06 2 31°43’N / 86°07’W 31°50’N / 85°59’W 11.30 Miles 200 Yards 25K Pike
42.3 1970-04-02 2 32°40’N / 86°55’W 32°42’N / 86°50’W 5.60 Miles 300 Yards 250K Dallas
42.6 1957-06-28 2 31°46’N / 86°43’W 31°51’N / 86°32’W 12.30 Miles 133 Yards 250K Butler
42.6 1983-12-06 3 32°24’N / 87°04’W 32°33’N / 86°54’W 13.00 Miles 500 Yards 1 19 2.5M Dallas
42.9 1959-07-01 2 32°25’N / 87°00’W 0.10 Mile 50 Yards 3 25K Dallas
43.5 1973-11-20 2 31°43’N / 86°16’W 25K Crenshaw
43.7 1955-04-21 2 32°23’N / 87°01’W 1.50 Miles 50 Yards 1 25K Dallas
43.7 1986-11-26 2 31°46’N / 85°58’W 31°49’N / 85°51’W 8.00 Miles 150 Yards 1 250K Pike
43.8 1978-05-01 2 32°24’N / 87°01’W 2.00 Miles 20 Yards 2.5M Dallas
43.8 1980-09-01 2 32°24’N / 87°01’W 0.20 Mile 50 Yards 250K Dallas
44.0 1984-05-03 2 32°26’N / 87°04’W 32°26’N / 86°58’W 7.50 Miles 50 Yards 2.5M Dallas
44.1 1962-01-05 2 31°45’N / 86°00’W 2.00 Miles 33 Yards 25K Pike
44.4 1974-01-20 2 31°43’N / 86°07’W 25K Pike
44.7 1965-09-29 2 31°42’N / 86°13’W 2 25K Crenshaw
46.4 1978-04-18 2 33°01’N / 86°19’W 0.10 Mile 80 Yards 25K Coosa
46.4 1979-11-25 2 32°44’N / 85°54’W 33°04’N / 85°44’W 25.00 Miles 60 Yards 2 250K Tallapoosa
47.0 2008-02-17 2 32°29’N / 87°06’W 32°33’N / 87°00’W 8.00 Miles 400 Yards 350K 0K Dallas
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down near Warrior Drive, just southeast of the Perry County line. It then tracked northeastward across AL-219 near the intersection of CR-230, moved right through the Summerfield Community, and crossed CR-37, before lifting just east of the intersection of CR-37 and CR-844. At least 5 structures, including 2 mobile homes and a metal warehouse, were destroyed. Twelve to fifteen additional structures, including several homes and an auto body shop, were damaged to varying degrees. Hundreds of trees were either snapped off or uprooted along the damage path. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A broken squall line, sparked by an advancing cold front and strong upper level storm, caused severe thunderstorms and tornadoes across Central Alabama.
47.5 1974-12-19 3 31°43’N / 85°53’W 31°50’N / 85°45’W 11.30 Miles 300 Yards 250K Pike
48.6 1961-12-11 2 33°02’N / 86°05’W 25K Coosa
48.6 1973-12-26 2 33°02’N / 86°05’W 0.10 Mile 27 Yards 1 25K Talladega
49.1 1996-03-06 3 32°25’N / 87°14’W 32°30’N / 86°58’W 19.00 Miles 400 Yards 4 40 8.0M 50K Dallas
Brief Description: A tornado first touched down just south-southwest of Marion Junction in northern Dallas County and travelled east-northeast before ending in the northeastern part of the county. The tornado touched down initially in a rural area composed of fields with scattered houses. It crossed U.S. Highway 80 at the Cahaba River or about 9 miles west-northwest of Selma. The tornado continued on its east-northeast path crossing State Highway 14 and State Highway 22 before ending about two and a half miles east of Highway 22. The tornado path was about 19 miles in length with a maximum width of about 400 yards. The tornado first touched down around 3:42 am based on radar imagery. Travelling at 35 to 40 miles an hour the tornado was on the ground for about 25 minutes ending around 4:07 am. Information from emergency management sources indicated that 14 houses were destroyed, 19 houses sustained major damage, 5 houses sustained minor damage, 20 mobile homes were destroyed, 17 mobile homes sustained major damage, and 12 mobiles homes sustained minor damage. At least 40 people were transported to area hospitals with injuries varying from minor to serious. Two deaths occurred in a mobile home and two deaths occurred in a permanent house. F17PH, M71PH, M50MH, F52MH
49.2 2008-02-06 2 33°00’N / 86°30’W 33°06’N / 86°18’W 14.00 Miles 2000 Yards 115K 0K Coosa
Brief Description: EVENT NARRATIVE: The tornado touched down in the Hidden Valley community along Lay Lake, about 2 miles northeast of Lay Dam. It then tracked northeastward, before producing its most significant damage just east of Marble Valley along County Road 56. Four large wooden power poles were snapped off. Two mobile homes were knocked off their foundations and rolled over. Hundreds of hardwood and softwood trees were either snapped off or uprooted along the path. The tornado then continued northeastward, eventually crossing into Talladega County. EPISODE NARRATIVE: A strong cold front and very intense upper level storm system moving across the Gulf Coast States brought numerous severe thunderstorms and several tornadoes to Central Alabama.
49.5 1961-04-27 2 31°40’N / 86°00’W 2 25K Pike
49.8 1972-01-10 2 32°44’N / 85°35’W 32°47’N / 85°33’W 4.50 Miles 50 Yards 25K Chambers
49.9 1964-12-24 2 31°48’N / 86°53’W 31°50’N / 86°49’W 4.90 Miles 33 Yards 25K Butler

The data shown on this page was compiled using the worldwide volcanic database, the United States earthquake database that covers the years 1638-1985, and the United States tornado and weather extremes database that covers the years 1950-2010.

How many tornadoes have been in Huntsville Alabama?

From the free and open-source encyclopedia Wikipedia Proceed to the navigation menu Continue to search Huntsville, Alabama has been hit by more than one tornado over its long history.

  • In April of 1822, a tornado was spotted in Huntsville for the first time in recorded history.
  • On the evening of April 1st, 1884, a category F2 tornado ripped across the area. The tornado had a ground path of 82 miles, passed across five counties, and was responsible for the deaths of at least two people.
  • In 1967, the city was affected by three tornadoes:
  • On November 24, 1967, early in the afternoon, an F2 tornado ripped across the area. Both the city’s eastern outskirts and the village of Big Cove, which is located nearby, were hit by the tornado.
  • At least four people were killed and 29 others were injured when a tornado with an F2 rating struck early in the morning of December 18, 1967. The path of the tornado extended for twenty miles, and at its broadest point, it was three hundred feet wide.
  • On the evening of December 21, 1967, early in the evening, an F1 tornado devastated the area.
  • During the Super Outbreak that occurred in April 1974, a tornado with a strength of F3 inflicted damage in Huntsville and traversed Monte Sano.
  • During Hurricane Danny in the early afternoon of August 16, 1985, two tornadoes occurred within an hour of each other on the western outskirts of the city at what is now Cummings Research Park. Both tornadoes were located in the same general area. The first tornado was classified as an F1 and lasted for 8.5 miles. The second tornado was classified as an F2 and lasted for 13 miles.
  • On November 15, 1989, a tornado with a preliminary rating of F4 devastated the southern part of the city, resulting in 21 fatalities.
  • On May 18, 1995, the northern suburbs were hit by the Anderson Hills tornado, which was likewise an F4 in strength.
  • On January 21, 2010, a tornado of an intensity of EF2 devastated the downtown area, including the Five Points neighborhood.
  • The 2011 Super Outbreak resulted in the formation of the 2011 Hackleburg–Phil Campbell tornado, which was responsible for damage in the northern suburbs of Huntsville.
  • On March 2, 2012, the northern suburbs of the city were hit by not one but two tornadoes.
  • On November 29, 2016, a tornado developed over the eastern part of the city and caused damage on Monte Sano Mountain.
  • On January 1st, 2022, there were two tornadoes that hit the suburbs that were close to the city.

Is Tornado Alley shifting?

Is there a movement to the east in Tornado Alley? – Credit for the photograph goes to Vittorio A. Gensini and Harold E. Brooks According to the findings of the research, it is. In Tornado Alley, the frequency of tornadoes has largely dropped over the past four decades, according to a research that was published in 2018.

  1. On the other hand, the frequency of tornadoes has increased just to the east, across the Lower Great Lakes and into the Deep South.
  2. This is seen on the map that was included in the research (note the hashed areas).
  3. It used to be that people were concerned about a tornado striking downtown Dallas, but current studies imply that downtown Memphis and Nashville are more likely to be struck.

Recent occurrences provide credence to this assertion: in March of 2020, Nashville was struck by a tornado, and Memphis has also had its fair share of experience with tornadoes. As a matter of fact, some meteorologists refer to this region as “Dixie Alley,” which is a reference to the growing frequency of tornadoes that have been occurring in the South. Where Did Tornadoes Hit In Alabama Yesterday

How many tornadoes does Alabama have?

The state of Alabama sees an average of 44 tornadoes every year. In an information sheet about tornadoes that was compiled by the University of Alabama, it was said that the second season for tornadoes in Tuscaloosa runs from November through early December. Although tornadoes most frequently occur in the late afternoon and early evening, they are capable of forming at any time.